News

Thank you New London Seniors!    

…For all that you have done for our community this year:

Fundraising & Donations: Holiday Boot Drive, Adopt-A-Senior, School Supplies, Care Packages for Armed Service Members, Holiday Cards to Veterans, Fundraiser for Soup Kitchen, Tommy Maynard Fund Raiser, N. L. High School Scholarship, N. L. Police Department Brochure, etc.

Volunteerism: Food Pantry, Nursing Home Visits, TVCCA Kitchen, Local Beach Clean-Up, TVCA RSVP Program, Sliver Threads Boutique Thrift Shop, Jason’s Tag Sale, Books Sales and Sawing Shop Sales at the Senior Center, Trips, Bingo, Volunteer Luncheon, Pen Pals Program, Scrapbooking Project for Nursing Home Residents, etc.

Collaboration with Community Organizations: Big Event and Kids Camp (w/ N. L. Recreation Department), “Carousal “ and Senior Prom (w/ Conn. College), Lightbulb Exchange (w/ Eversource), Summer Fiesta (w/ Centro de la Comunidad).

Special Events at the Senior Center: Health Education Series, Intergenerational Programing, Holiday Gathering, Butterfly Memorial, Talent Show, Gong Show, Mother’s Day Tea, Father’s Day Breakfast…

 

 

 

 

 

    Stroke Awareness – Content by Judy

    Yes, it is a true emergency!! If anyone, any age has sudden numbness in their face, arm, leg, especially on one side of the body. Sudden confusion, trouble speaking, or difficulty understanding speech. Sudden trouble seeing in one or both eyes. Sudden trouble walking, dizziness, loss of balance, lack of coordination. Sudden severe headache with no known cause. Call 911 right away!! This is a real emergency. If left unattended the consequences can be life altering if not fatal.

    If you think someone might be having a stroke, act F.A.S.T.

    F—Face: Ask the person to smile. Does one side of the face droop?

    A—Arms: Ask the person to raise both arms. Does one arm drift downward?

    S—Speech: Ask the person to repeat a simple phrase. Is the speech slurred or strange?

    T—Time: If you see any of these signs, call 9-1-1 right away.

    The sooner someone is treated the better the outcome. Strokes can be potentially reversed or at least stopped if a stroke is treated within the first 3 hours. Call an ambulance. Do not drive them!! The crew on the ambulance can start treatment sooner and the outcome will be better. You want life-saving treatment as soon as possible!!

    If you think you are having a stroke call 911 right away. You might not be able to make that call even a few minutes later.

    Every year over 800,000 people have a stoke. Nearly 150,000 die each year. Strokes are the leading cause of serious long-term disability. BUT 80% of strokes are PREVENTABLE!!

    Most strokes are caused by clots blocking blood flow in the brain and strokes are a leading cause of disability. Some ways to prevent or lower your risk of having a stroke is to stop smoking, limit alcohol,  maintain a healthy weight, eat plenty of veggies and fruit, and exercise. Also be sure you are managing your diabetes, high blood pressure, cholesterol, and heart disease. Stress and depression can also contribute to the risk of a stroke.

    By looking at your own risk factors  of having a stroke and living a healthier lifestyle you can help reduce the odds of having a stroke. Be sure to review all of this with your health care professionals. Check with them before taking or changing supplements to see if they are right for you. Get regular checkups. Reach out to other professionals for help to improve your lifestyle.

    And it is never too late to change! Talk to your doctor and modify some things in your life!!

    Reflections – Content by Judy

    Time has a way of passing much faster than we realize. I think they – whoever they are – steal time as we sleep. Haven’t you been shocked when you look in the mirror and see how time has passed. Or looked at your children and been surprised how many years have flown by? And it doesn’t seem possible for all those years have gone by. If you close your eyes and look at yourself as you feel you are, you’re much younger than that darn mirror tells you.

    Recently I came across photographer Tom Hussey’s work “Reflections” which shows elderly people looking in the mirror and seeing who they were many years before. A fireman, a nurse, the scholar, the pharmacist, a new mother, a welder.

    “Reflections” was inspired by a World War II veteran who said, “I can’t believe I am going to be 80, I feel like I just came back from the war. I look in the mirror and I see this old guy.”

    It brings to mind that with retirement and age we lose a big part of our identity. As we enter adulthood we are often asked “What do you want to be?”

    But seldom after we retire are, we asked “So what did you used to do?” “Who were you before?”

    We have been a big part of building our towns and cities. We have served in many positions be it elected or volunteer. We have been the scout leaders, the umpire, the coaches, the committee member.

    And for those of us who feel we might be losing our identity lets share the stories of our past, volunteer to teach others, once again become that committee member, volunteer at the local school, senior center or hospital. Continue to be an active part of the community.

    And for those who haven’t reached those later years, the next time you encounter the elders in your community be it at the grocery store, at your place of business or just in passing take a few minutes to find out more about who they are and who they were. You will be surprised just who you are talking to!